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In your case cheap extra super cialis online american express erectile dysfunction injection dosage, dealing with people - a little at a time purchase extra super cialis 100 mg mastercard impotence after 40. With PTSD discount extra super cialis 100 mg overnight delivery erectile dysfunction mayo clinic, where there are flashbacks and recall of a traumatic event order extra super cialis from india erectile dysfunction at 21, effective treatment involves ways of dealing with the traumatic memories of the past. Mistymare4: My anxiety totally revolves around going in public and driving like work, grocery shopping etc.. David: Would you say that agoraphobia is the most difficult anxiety disorder to recover from? But I think the most difficult one is the one you have. Lexio: What if the fear of going crazy causes your panic attacks? So you need some coping techniques to help you pass the time until the attack passes. David: Here is a comment, then a question on generalized anxiety disorder:ogramare: Anxiety medications have pretty well eliminated my panic but I am left with a giant case of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). I can feel really nervous with no mental stimulation, no panic and no apparent reason. This may be off-topic for this discussion as I have not been here before. Carbonell: In my experience, when someone with GAD also has a history of panic, the generalized anxiety is usually a form of anticipatory anxiety. Physical tension, limiting your movements, all manner of "self protective" measures like these can maintain the generalized anxiety. Carbonell, for being our guest tonight and for sharing this information with us. And to those in the audience, thank you for coming and participating. We have a very large and active community here at Healthyplace. The weekend is almost here:)Our conference tonight is on "OCD: What Can Be Done To Help". Claiborn from the OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder) mail list where he responds to "ask-the-expert" questions. Claiborn is a member of the scientific advisory board of the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation. At his "day job" though, one of the things he does is provide cognitive-behavioral therapy to adult OCD sufferers. Very briefly, because maybe we have some visitors tonight who are learning about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder for the first time, what is it and how do you know if you have it? Claiborn: OCD is well-named as it is a disorder where people have obsessions and/or compulsions. Obsessions are ideas thoughts, images, impulses, etc. Compulsions are things people do often, over-and-over, in a stereotyped way to reduce their distress. The disorder is diagnosed if a person is suffering from these and it takes up significant time or causes interference with functioning in life. Some children may get it as a reaction to strep infections. We also know that it is not caused by bad toilet training, as Freud used to think. David: You provide cognitive-behavioral therapy to help OCD sufferers. Claiborn: Cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, is a treatment method that includes doing things like intentionally exposing a person to what they fear and stopping them from carrying out compulsions. It also includes methods like looking at errors or problems in thinking that lead to distress. CBT is as effective, or more effective, as a treatment for OCD, than medication. Most people who go through CBT will get a significant benefit in reduction of symptoms. David: How important are medications in controlling the OCD symptoms and also in helping to be more receptive to therapy? Is it imperative for a person with OCD to be on medications? Claiborn: On any given trial, about half of the people will get a benefit from medications, and if we look at trying several medications about 70% can benefit. However, some people believe that the reason medication helps is because it reduces anxiety and allows people to do the exposure-based things that really help. If we look at someone with mild to moderate Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, they may get as much help as they need from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy alone and never need to take medication. Some people will not do CBT until after they are on medication. In either case, if they ever want to be off medications, they will need to do CBT. Experts on children recommend that all children with OCD get CBT and some get medications. David: Before we get to some audience questions, what about self-help for OCD? Claiborn: We have reason to believe that self-help methods can be very useful especially for mild to moderate OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder). There are several good OCD self help books and some good support groups. David: I was also wondering if a person can ever make a full recovery from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, or whether it is a lifelong disorder that is constantly managed? Claiborn: If we say that a person whose symptoms are so mild as to not be a problem is cured, then some people will get there. For most people with OCD, however, it is a chronic problem and needs to be managed. Claiborn:AmyBeth: I believe my best friend suffers from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. It is so bad now that she can hardly live in her apartment. She knows she needs to change but she can not seem to. How can I help her change without losing her as my friend because she gets mad at my suggestion? Claiborn: Your friend has hoarding, a common problem in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. This type of OCD is very hard to treat and it almost always requires a professional. There is a chapter in a text book on OCD that describes its treatment. If you want to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it after this, I will tell you where to find it. The professional, working with hoarding, will probably need to make home visits, which is not something most are willing to do. You can read up on hoarding and help your friend get rid of some stuff, but she has to be the one who decides what to get rid of and when. Claiborn: It used to be thought that CBT would not work well for people who did not have obvious compulsions. This is sometimes called "Pure O" for people who have only obsessions. The fact is that these people usually have mental rituals or other ways to reduce anxiety. The answer is yes, this type of OCD will respond to CBT as well as any from of OCD. This type is much harder to treat as a self-help project. Will I get better even if I do not take any medications? Are there mild cases such as mine that will just go away? Claiborn: Although, sometimes, it may go away, I would not want to wait and see. Not everyone needs medication and in mild cases, often CBT will be enough help that OCD becomes what we call "sub-clinical," meaning it is not taking up much time or causing much distress. In OCD this can happen and others know there is a problem, but you might think it makes sense. I take medications, but despite improvement, I still have difficulty getting rid of "stuff. Claiborn: If you mean that you hoard stuff, there are a couple of ideas. You could join a special email list of hoarders and get some support from them. You can try to figure out what is so scary about getting rid of stuff and take some chances throwing out not-too-scary stuff first, and move up the list.

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It discusses dealing with the school system and getting what your child deserves and is entitled to purchase extra super cialis master card erectile dysfunction 20. I encourage you to drop by and read through her site order extra super cialis discount impotence in 30s. Mell: I can understand this zero tolerance policy schools have discount extra super cialis 100mg fast delivery erectile dysfunction co.za, but if a 6 year old threatens to blow up the school order cheap extra super cialis online erectile dysfunction over 40, why would they take it seriously? George Lynn: IMHO schools are trying to deal with overcrowding by using methods that lose sight of the situation of individual children. You require the school to continue to educate him until they are satisfied that he can return to class. The important thing is to know that you do have rights in the situation. Oftentimes, we take it for granted that the system can get away with this kind of "Spartacus like" treatment of our kids, but we all have rights. David: Some comments on how schools react to threatening behavior: C. Gates: Yes, they do take it seriously here in Houston, Texas. CABF has very informative handouts from their site to use. I did this and it really helped the teachers to better understand why my son does some of the things he does. Kris23: Do you find that many Bipolar kids are also gifted? They most often show gifts as (believe it or not) little philosophers or writers. Learning disabilities often involve short-term memory issues and all the ones caused by impulsivity. When I am working with these gifted kids, I try to give them a story line about themselves and confidence that things will work out. Fact is the research is positive for bipolar children who get medical attention. One more thing I have noticed is that the parents of these kids themselves are often outstanding in some area. It seems it is getting more difficult as he gets older. Batty: There is a great book, Uniquely Gifted: Identifying and Meeting the Needs of the Twice-Exceptional Student by Kiesa Kay, that addresses gifted children with learning disabilities!! We are the only ones who can help our children even though it is so difficult for us. I always wonder if I am doing everything I can because the process is so slow. On one hand, raising kids like ours can be bruising. On the other, it really helps to keep a vision of what is possible for your child, and to document his accomplishments and yours. Keep your sense of humor and try to find the central patterns in his personality that are unique. Oftentimes our kids can think deeper and be more creative than "neurotypicals," so holding that vision is very important. When you look at how civilization has progressed, you find bipolars all throughout the map. Lynn, what advice can you offer to single parents of bipolar children, especially where the non-custodial parent is bipolar and non-compliant with bipolar medications? George Lynn: Educate your child about the situation as best you can. Teach him to monitor himself when he is with your ex. Wear your cell phone so he can call if he has to, and try to control medications from your end so that he is less dependent on your ex to get them. If the ex is un-medicated, your child may be in danger. Oftentimes the ex may be diagnosed "borderline personality disorder" or show symptoms of this. Follow the situation very closely and get involved legally if you have to. Once again, having a supportive professional in the picture is essential. Batty: Keeping a sense of humor and a positive vision is helped greatly by support from places like CABF--and in my area we have even started local support groups. Gates: Let the non-custodial parent take the child for a few weeks off of the meds and they will change their minds. I know that one untreated bipolar can not handle another untreated bipolar. MB0821: At what age do you begin discussing the more technical aspects of the bipolar disorder with children? George Lynn: MBO81, you have got to make sure that your timing is right and that the way you explain it is understandable to the child. There is not particular age, but it is important for him or her to have the issue put in terms that are age appropriate. Kids with these challenges are usually eager to make sense of the situation, so I will tell them that their brains just have a tendency to overheat at times, or that they are like big ships and it is hard to stop them once they get going, and that the bipolar medications and their self-control strategies help them so they can have friends and be successful. We have an 18 year old who was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder last April, after years of being labeled ADHD and ODD. One of our many problems is that our 24 year old son, who is living at home while he finishes nursing school, has little patience with his brother. He is also very critical of our parenting decisions. George Lynn: Your question points to the essential presence of a good family therapist who understands Bipolar Disorder and sibling issues. I would address the issue to your 24 year old as a professional consideration. What can he learn from his brother about the kinds of people that he will treat in hospital? Sometimes it takes distance for siblings to overcome their resentment and you may just have to wait it out and give information to the 24 year old when he can hear it. The light bulb went off for him, and he accepted his diagnosis better. George Lynn: Some kids can understand the triune brain model. I tell them they have three brains - draw pictures of these. We have the cortex (the civilized brain), the limbic brain (the animal brain), and the base brain (heartbeat, etc. I tell kids with Bipolar Disorder that, in their case, the limbic brain sometimes sits as an equal at the table with the cortex and that the medications help their thinking brain keep things in check. Martha Hellander: George, I want to commend you for your first book Survival Strategies for Parenting Your ADD Child (as you call them "Attention Different") as well as your new one on parenting bipolar kids. The earlier one was the only thing I could find in 1996 when my 8 year old daughter was diagnosed. Your description of the "limbic wave" was so approprate. I still refer to it often when talking to parents on the CABF message boards. The "limbic wave" that Martha mentions is how I describe the sudden explosivity of our kids. MarciaAboutBP: We have a Bipolar parent who, in defending himself from a raging 16 year old child, threw up a forearm, which hit the child and broke her nose. How can parents explain when the child is so violent? George Lynn: Marcia, you need keep a track record by way of a good psychiatric evaluation. The best thing to have is a are allowed to defend yourself. If you make it clear to investigating officers how you were defending yourself, you should not have a hassle. At the same time, you run the risk of at least having to explain this to a judge. The important thing is for parents to keep their own cool because the limbic brain does not think, and when one limbic brain is talking to another, tragedy can happen! Batty: My son gave his psychologist a bloody nose and now everybody believes us! KateIA: I have read your book with its unique perspective of both professional and parent. I especially appreciated your noting the many positive aspects of bipolar children and the need for compassion in dealing with them. When I feel discouraged, I find myself reviewing certain sections and immediately feel empowered and encouraged in managing my amazing 14 year old BP/TS/OCD son.